Publications

Service Plan 2022/23 – 2024/25

Service Plan 2022/23 – 2024/25

April 2022
This service plan is driven by a renewed emphasis on corporate planning. Our office will align our service plans more directly with the Auditor General Act and the Performance Reporting Principles for the B.C. Public Service. This new plan shows how our objectives are more balanced with our priorities and activities. We have selected performance measures that are more directly linked to our performance and offer better long-term, comparative value. As you will see in this service plan, we are taking important and necessary steps that will contribute to the environment of inclusivity and engagement that defines our organization. Most of all, these measures will greatly assist our talented and dedicated community of employees to excel in the work they do for the Legislative Assembly and the people in British Columbia.
Report cover showing the Site C dam under constructions

Fraud Risk Management: Site C Dam and Hydroelectric Energy Project

April 2022
Site C is the largest and most expensive infrastructure project in B.C.’s history, with an estimated cost of $16 billion. Our audit looked to determine if BC Hydro has established a program to effectively manage fraud risk for the project.
cover page showing woman working at home with laptop computer

Managing Cybersecurity in the Telework Environment

March 2022
The number of B.C. government teleworkers grew 20-fold after the COVID-19 pandemic started​. Teleworking has many benefits but it can also pose increased risk to sensitive government data. Our audit focused on the Office of the Chief Information Officer's responsibility for cybersecurity risk management in the government telework environment. It looked at the OCIO's strategic activities, such as risk assessment, telework-related policies, data protection measures, and cybersecurity training and guidance.   

Financial Statement Audit Coverage Plan for fiscal years ending in 2023, 2024 and 2025

March 2022
This plan is our annual plan for auditing the financial statements of more than 140 public-sector organizations included as part of the massive audit of government’s summary financial statements. It includes central government, Crown corporations, universities, colleges, school districts, health authorities and similar entities controlled by or accountable to the provincial government. The Financial Statement Audit Coverage Plan outlines which public-sector organizations will be audited directly by the auditor general’s office and which ones will be audited by private-sector firms. 
Report cover image showing a mother and child in silhouette

BC Housing’s COVID-19 Response: Additional Safe Spaces for Women and Children Leaving Violence

March 2022
For many women and children living in unstable or violent situations, home is not a safe place. Transition housing provides safety and support, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, many providers had to reduce their capacity to enable physical distancing and help keep residents safe from COVID-19. In response, BC Housing leased additional safe spaces in hotels and motels across the province.   Our audit examined BC Housing’s effectiveness when it provided additional safe spaces for women and children leaving violence during COVID-19. 
Report cover image showing the B.C. government logo on an outdoor sign

Fraud Risk Management: Office of the Comptroller General

March 2022
The Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) provides oversight and support, while ministries have their own processes and controls to manage fraud risk. Our audit looked to see if the OCG had established an effective framework to manage the risk of fraud.
Report cover image showing a hand putting a key in a door lock in a hallway

BC Housing’s COVID-19 Response: Property Purchases

March 2022
BC Housing purchased nine properties in Vancouver and Victoria in 2020 and 2021 to provide temporary housing to people experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 pandemic. The properties represented a significant public investment – totalling $221 million – that had to be secured quickly during the emergency. This audit examined whether BC Housing’s property purchases followed relevant approvals, policies and procedures. 

Pages